RE : Veteran's Day and it's Origin

Discussion in 'Offtopic Lounge' started by $nakeEye$, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. $nakeEye$, Nov 6, 2018

    $nakeEye$

    $nakeEye$ Member

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    My wife received this synopsis thru her FaceBook account -

    Thought it might be interesting to relay the info to ALL -

    Veterans and non-veterans alike ! Veteran\'s Day Info.png
     
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  2. crispcem, Nov 6, 2018

    crispcem

    crispcem Member

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    Thanks for posting that! I got curious and found this interesting story :
    The Story of Flanders Fields and the "Buddy Poppy"
    Tyne Cot Cemetery in Flanders Fields, Belgium.jpg


    The red field poppy came to be known as an internationally recognized symbol of Remembrance from its association with poppies flowering in the spring of 1915 on the battlefields of Belgium, France and Gallipoli this vivid red flower has become synonymous with great loss of life in war. In the fighting zones the devastation caused to the landscape created a wasteland of churned up soil, smashed up woods, fields and streams. Few elements of the natural world could survive except for the soldiers who had little choice but to live in an underground network of holes, tunnels and trenches. In most cases the only living things they would see during tours of duty in the front line were scavenging rats, mice and lice.

    The spring of 1915 was the first time that warm weather began to warm up the countryside after the cold winter at war in 1914-1915. In the region around Ypres in Belgian Flanders the months of April and May 1915 were unusually warm. Farmers were plowing their fields close up to the front lines and new life was starting to grow. One of the plants that began to grow in clusters on and around the battle zones was the red field or corn poppy (its species name is: papaver rhoeas). It is often to be found in or on the edges of fields where grain is grown. The field poppy is an annual plant which flowers each year between about May and August. Its seeds are disseminated on the wind and can lie dormant in the ground for a long time. If the ground is disturbed from the early spring the seeds will germinate and the poppy flowers will grow. This is what happened in parts of the front lines in Belgium and France. Once the ground was disturbed by the fighting, the poppy seeds lying in the ground began to germinate and grow during the warm weather in the spring and summer months of 1915, 1916, 1917 and 1918. The field poppy was also blooming in parts of the Turkish battlefields on the Gallipoli peninsula when the ANZAC and British Forces arrived at the start of the campaign in April 1915.

    The sight of these delicate, vibrant red flowers growing on the shattered ground caught the attention of a Canadian soldier by the name of John McCrae. He noticed how they had sprung up in the disturbed ground of the burials around the artillery position he was in. It was during the warm days of early May 1915 when he found himself with his artillery brigade near to the Ypres-Yser canal. Maj. John McCrae, at the time, was a Canadian military doctor and artillery commander. On May 2, 1915, during the early days of the Second Battle of Ypres, a young Canadian artillery officer and friend of McCrae, Lt. Alexis Helmer, was killed by a German artillery shell that landed near him and exploded. As the brigade doctor, McCrae was asked to conduct the burial service for Alexis because the chaplain had been called away elsewhere on duty that evening. It is believed that later that evening, after the burial, John began the draft for his now famous poem “In Flanders Fields”.

    The origin of the red Flanders poppy as a modern-day symbol of Remembrance was the inspiration of an American woman, Miss Moina Michael, “The Poppy Lady”. It was on a Saturday morning, November 9, 1918, two days before the Armistice was declared at 11 o'clock on November 11th. Moina Belle Michael was on duty at the YMCA Overseas War Secretaries' headquarters in New York. She was working in the “Gemot” in Hamilton Hall. This was a reading room and a place where U.S. servicemen would often gather with friends and family to say their goodbyes before they went on overseas service. On that day Hamilton Hall and the “Gemot” were busy with people coming and going. The Twenty-fifth Conference of the Overseas YMCA War Secretaries was in progress at the headquarters. During the first part of the morning as a young soldier passed by Moina's desk he left a copy of the latest November edition of the “Ladies Home Journal” on the desk. At about 10:30 a.m. Moina found a few moments to herself and browsed through the magazine. In it she came across a page which carried a vivid color illustration with the poem entitled “We Shall Not Sleep”. This was an alternative name sometimes used for John McCrae's poem, which was also called “In Flanders Fields”. LtCol. John McCrae had died of pneumonia several months earlier on January 28, 1918.

    Moina had come across the poem before, but reading it on this occasion she found herself transfixed by the last verse. In her autobiography, “The Miracle Flower”, Moina describes this experience as deeply spiritual. She felt as though she was actually being called in person by the voices which had been silenced by death. At that moment Moina made a personal pledge to “keep the faith”. She vowed always to wear a red poppy of Flanders Fields as a sign of remembrance. It would become an emblem for “keeping the faith with all who died”. Compelled to make a note of this pledge she scribbled down a response on the back of a used envelope. She titled her poem “We Shall Keep The Faith”.

    Three men attending the conference then arrived at Moina's desk. On behalf of the delegates they asked her to accept a check for 10 dollars, in appreciation of the effort she had made to brighten up the place with flowers at her own expense. She was touched by the gesture and replied that she would buy twenty-five red poppies with the money. She showed them the illustration for John McCrae's poem “In Flanders Fields” in the Ladies Home Journal, together with her response to it “We Shall Keep the Faith”. The delegates took both poems back into the Conference. After searching the shops for some time that day Moina found one large and twenty-four small artificial red silk poppies in Wanamaker's department store. When she returned to duty at the YMCA Headquarters later that evening the delegates from the Conference crowded around her asking for poppies to wear. Keeping one poppy for her coat collar she gave out the rest of the poppies to the enthusiastic delegates. According to Moina, this was the first group-effort asking for poppies to wear in memory of “all who died in Flanders Fields”. Since this group had given her the money with which to buy them, she considered that she made the first sale of the Flanders Fields Memorial Poppy on November 9, 1918.

    It is primarily through Moina Michael’s efforts, over the years that followed, (and those of Madame Anna E. Guerin, “the poppy lady of France”) that the red corn poppy and the poem “In Flanders Fields” have been associated with Armistice Day. The Armistice was signed in Compiegne, France at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month of 1918 to mark the end of all hostilities associated with World War I, the “war to end all wars”. After WWII the name was changed to Veterans Day in the United States. In the British Commonwealth countries it has always been known as Remembrance Day.

    So where did the term “Buddy” poppy come from? In 1921, the Franco-American Children’s League conducted a nationwide distribution of Poppies made in France, for the benefit of children in the war-torn areas of France and Belgium. The inspiration came from John McCrae’s poem. In October 1921, the American Legion, at its convention in Kansas City, repudiated its action of 1920 in choosing the poppy as its official flower and substituted the daisy. In May 1922, the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States conducted a nationwide distribution of poppies made in France. This was after the dissolution of the Franco-American Children’s League, and in response to an appeal by Madame Guerin. In October 1922, following the first nationwide distribution of poppies by the VFW, the American Legion Convention repudiated the daisy as its official flower and again adopted the poppy. In the spring of 1923, the American Legion conducted its first nationwide sale of poppies made by a French manufacturer. In 1923, the VFW evolved the idea which resulted in the VFW “Buddy Poppy” fashioned by disabled and needy veterans who were paid for their work in assembling “Buddy” poppies. In February 1924, the VFW registered the name "Buddy" Poppy with the U.S. Patent Office, and still holds all trademark rights in the name “Buddy” under the classification of artificial flowers. Proceeds from the annual VFW distribution of “Buddy Poppies” go back mostly to disabled and needy veterans.
    http://utnrotcalum.org/alumni/FlandersFieldsStory.htm
     
    #2
  3. basicstrategy777, Nov 7, 2018

    basicstrategy777

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    The GreatWar 1914-1918
    In Flanders Fields
    [​IMG]
    by John McCrae, May 1915

    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.

    777
     
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  4. Twelve4s, Nov 7, 2018

    Twelve4s

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  5. basicstrategy777, Nov 8, 2018

    basicstrategy777

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    nasty stuff
     
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  6. The Midnight Skulker, Nov 8, 2018

    The Midnight Skulker

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    I was going to wait to post this on 11/11, but it seems appropriate to do so now as an addendum to the posts above.
     
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  7. Twelve4s, Nov 8, 2018

    Twelve4s

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  8. von duck, Nov 8, 2018

    von duck

    von duck Member

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    So's those mid-term elections. What now? :cool:
     
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  9. yacraps, Nov 8, 2018

    yacraps

    yacraps Member

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    #9
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  10. yacraps, Nov 8, 2018

    yacraps

    yacraps Member

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    Neat info Crisp
     
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  11. $nakeEye$, Nov 8, 2018

    $nakeEye$

    $nakeEye$ Member

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    I Thank You for posting the informative video depicting the numerous Allied / American lives that were lost during battles of WWII -

    When one calculates the number of graves in each area that the video depicts -

    The numbers become sobering and overwhelming !

    And THAT is ONLY the TIP of the iceberg-

    What is NOT depicted is the countless who were maimed physically and physiologically due to the trauma they suffered during the battles that were fought to preserve the integrity of the Free world and the well being of humanity in general !

    War is such a waste of resources - life. limb and prosperity (money) - that it is - in MY estimation - a TOTAL WASTE !

    However, sine the beginning of recorded time - dating back to Cain and Abel -

    Annihilation has seemed to become the recourse of means to overcome adverse ways and means !

    On THAT note - it will be MOST interesting to see WHAT the outcome of the " South American Caravan " - If and When -

    They reach the United States border !

    $...eE..$
     
    #11
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
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  12. HornHighBLEVE

    HornHighBLEVE Member

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    Thank you all...for your service to the Republic.

    RVN/OIF/OEF
     
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